humansofnewyork:

"I once threw a pen at a kid’s head for raising his hand in class and saying that PMS should disqualify women from leadership positions."

humansofnewyork:

"I once threw a pen at a kid’s head for raising his hand in class and saying that PMS should disqualify women from leadership positions."

2 weeks ago
14,897 notes
huffingtonpost:

An entrepreneurial girl scout sold 117 boxes of cookies at a marijuana dispensary.  

Genius

huffingtonpost:

An entrepreneurial girl scout sold 117 boxes of cookies at a marijuana dispensary.  

Genius

(Source: Mashable)

1 month ago
2,094 notes
What the f**k? You guys have a Shake Shack here?
humansofnewyork:

"I left my third wife by putting a note on her pillow saying: ‘Gone to the store to get cigarettes. Be back in 5 minutes.’ That was twelve years ago and I haven’t been back yet. I don’t even smoke."

humansofnewyork:

"I left my third wife by putting a note on her pillow saying: ‘Gone to the store to get cigarettes. Be back in 5 minutes.’ That was twelve years ago and I haven’t been back yet. I don’t even smoke."

3 months ago
8,559 notes
npr:

Friends, we need your help.
Last week, Gregory Warner and David Kestenbaum reported on the afterlife of American clothes. Lots of t-shirts from used clothes bin in the U.S. eventually make their way to sub-Saharan Africa.
Including the one above. From Jennifer’s bat-mitzvah from November 20, 1993. We want to find Jennifer.
What we Know: Jennifer’s bat mitzvah was on November 20, 1993. The theme may have been cartoons. And there’s a nametag in the shirt labeled Rachel Williams.
That’s all we know. Which is where you come in.
Do you know Rachel? Do you know Jennifer? Help us solve the mystery. Please email us at planetmoney@npr.org, and put “that’s my shirt” in the subject line. And please share this as much as you can. It would be really awesome to find Jennifer and talk to her about her bat mitzvah t-shirt’s journey.

npr:

Friends, we need your help.

Last week, Gregory Warner and David Kestenbaum reported on the afterlife of American clothes. Lots of t-shirts from used clothes bin in the U.S. eventually make their way to sub-Saharan Africa.

Including the one above. From Jennifer’s bat-mitzvah from November 20, 1993. We want to find Jennifer.

What we Know: Jennifer’s bat mitzvah was on November 20, 1993. The theme may have been cartoons. And there’s a nametag in the shirt labeled Rachel Williams.

That’s all we know. Which is where you come in.

Do you know Rachel? Do you know Jennifer? Help us solve the mystery. Please email us at planetmoney@npr.org, and put “that’s my shirt” in the subject line. And please share this as much as you can. It would be really awesome to find Jennifer and talk to her about her bat mitzvah t-shirt’s journey.

4 months ago
1,147 notes

pbsthisdayinhistory:

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

10 Women Google Doodles You Might Not Recognize

Google vice president Megan Smith has said she wants to use Google Doodles to highlight notable — though often overlooked — women in science and technology. But it’s not just STEM women that Google Doodles have honored in 2013, and here 10 female faces that showcase the diversity of women’s accomplishments around the world.

From top to bottom:

Maria Callas: renown American opera singer known for her impressive vocal range.

Wangari Maathai: Kenyan environmentalist, political activist and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004.

Mary Leakey: Archaeologist and anthropologist who discovered the first fossilized Proconsul skull and became known as one of the world’s most distinguished fossil hunters.

Edith Head: Iconic costume designer who won eight Academy Awards during her career.

Katherine Mansfield: New Zealand modernist short fiction writer.

Maria Mitchell: American astronomer who discovered the “Miss Mitchell’s Comet” in 1847.

Maria Elena Walsh: Argentine poet, novelist and musician, most lauded for her children’s literature, which has been compared to Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland.”

Emma Gad: Danish writer, socialite and satirist best known for her book of etiquette.

Shoshana Damari: Yemenite–Israeli singer known as the “Queen of Hebrew Music.”

Shakuntala Devi: Indian writer and child prodigy, popularly known as the “human calculator.”

Great post.

4 months ago
4,445 notes
glaad:

A judge has ruled that Texas ban on marriage equality is unconstitutional! 

glaad:

A judge has ruled that Texas ban on marriage equality is unconstitutional! 

(via newsweek)

1 month ago
1,387 notes
theatlantic:

Feminism, Depravity, and Power in House of Cards

House of Cards, which recently released its second season on Netflix, is a series “intent on congratulating the viewer for being suspicious of politicians,” says TV critic Todd VanDerWerff, ”but it’s not particularly interested in examining root causes for political corruption.” Is that so? My reaction to the show is different. As Ian Crouch argued in The New Yorker, its dark vision of Washington “expresses an implicit contempt for the American public,” since we are the ones “who tolerate and thus perpetuate” its “real-life theatre of venality and aggression.” The polity’s attitudes toward power is one root cause of D.C. corruption. 
How many House of Cards viewers root for Frank Underwood’s rise, or at least condone his moral code of “ruthless pragmatism”? The show is certainly tempting us to do so, just as Breaking Bad’s writers tempted us to root for Walter White. Pondering that show, Ross Douthat wrote that it challenges audiences to actually justify their moral norms: “Why is it so wrong to kill strangers — often dangerous strangers! — so that your own family can survive and prosper? Why is it wrong to exploit people you don’t see or care about for the sake of those inside your circle? Why is Walter White’s empire-building — carried out with boldness, brilliance and guile — not an achievement to be admired?”
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

Feminism, Depravity, and Power in House of Cards

House of Cards, which recently released its second season on Netflix, is a series “intent on congratulating the viewer for being suspicious of politicians,” says TV critic Todd VanDerWerff, ”but it’s not particularly interested in examining root causes for political corruption.” Is that so? My reaction to the show is different. As Ian Crouch argued in The New Yorker, its dark vision of Washington “expresses an implicit contempt for the American public,” since we are the ones “who tolerate and thus perpetuate” its “real-life theatre of venality and aggression.” The polity’s attitudes toward power is one root cause of D.C. corruption. 

How many House of Cards viewers root for Frank Underwood’s rise, or at least condone his moral code of “ruthless pragmatism”? The show is certainly tempting us to do so, just as Breaking Bad’s writers tempted us to root for Walter White. Pondering that show, Ross Douthat wrote that it challenges audiences to actually justify their moral norms: “Why is it so wrong to kill strangers — often dangerous strangers! — so that your own family can survive and prosper? Why is it wrong to exploit people you don’t see or care about for the sake of those inside your circle? Why is Walter White’s empire-building — carried out with boldness, brilliance and guile — not an achievement to be admired?”

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

1 month ago
228 notes
A lack of diversity means fewer ideas, perspectives and pushback that come with a varied and eclectic group of folks at the table.
Mary Barra, GM's New CEO, Is The Company's First Female Chief

(Source: fastcompany)

4 months ago
32 notes
tylerisajoke:

If fast food workers were paid in Big Mac meals, how much would they make?

tylerisajoke:

If fast food workers were paid in Big Mac meals, how much would they make?

(via mediamattersforamerica)

4 months ago
71 notes